History

Serving the Borough

1902

May 8, 1902 - Siegfried Volunteer Fire Co. #1 was given permission to hold a test of their new chemical engine on May 17, 1902 at Levan Park.


1903

August 6, 1903 - The Fire Committee reports signing a contract for two chemical engines, the price for both was $1,500.

November 5, 1903 - Two engines were purchased from C. J. Holloway & Co. through Culbertson & King, Agents. The Fire Committee reported that they had been tested and the Committee recommends that Council accept them.

December 3, 1903 - The Fire Committee was directed to procure the necessary chemicals for charging and recharging the chemical engines.


1904

January 7, 1904 - The Fire Committee, with the captains of the two fire companies, were instructed to draw up an ordinance to govern the Fire Department.

June 2, 1904 - The Fire Committee reported a shortage of chemicals. Also, the Committee was directed to look into a lease agreement with A. O. Sheiry.

July 7, 1904 - An agreement of lease with A. O. Sheiry for rooms for the Fire Co. was read and approved.

December 1, 1904 - Peter Beil asked the Council for financial and moral support for the Siegfried Volunteer Fire Co. #1. The Fire Committee asked Council to consider this application for support. The Council referred the problem to the Fire Committee with the power to act.


1905

January 5, 1905 - Coal was furnished to the Siegfried Volunteer Fire Co. #1 and the Fire Committee suggested further help.

March 2, 1905 - Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 requested that Council pay a gas bill of $12 and an electric light bill of $1. Also, Chairman Heckman of the Fire Committee suggested an appropriation for the Siegfried Volunteer Fire Co. #1.

June 1, 1905 - The Siegfried Volunteer Fire Co. #1 reported needing funds. The Fire Committee asked Council for help. The President of Council instructed the Fire Committee to have the Fire Co. (hand in bills.(

July 6, 1905 - H. E. Newhard and Samuel Laubach announced they were willing to haul the chemical engines to a fire at a cost of $2 per fire.

October 5, 1905 - The President of Council instructed the Fire Committee to make a list of paraphernalia necessary to equip the Fire Companies.


1906

January 4, 1906 - A fire was reported a J. Kleppinger(s. Both chemical engines were there, but neither worked properly.

June 7, 1906 - George Kuntz, a trustee of the Volunteer Fire Co. requested to meet with the Fire Committee.

July 5, 1906 - The Fire Co. requested equipment.

  

1907

June 6, 1907 - Mr. Sieger requested the removal of the chemical engine from his stable. The Street Commissioner was instructed to move it to the Town Hall.

August 1, 1907 - Alliance Fire Co. requested equipment. Also, the chemical engine was moved from Mr. Sieger(s shed to A. O. Sheiry(s (place.(

September 5, 1907 - The Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 reported to Council they were in a position to build their own hall and asked Council to purchase a compound chemical engine and necessary apparatus. The Fire Committee was authorized to obtain prices.

October 3, 1907 - Bids for the compound chemical engine were received but not opened. Bids would be opened on October 8, 1907. Ordinance #123 was presented authorizing the Fire Committee to buy a compound chemical engine.

October 8, 1907 - Ordinance #123 was finally passed. Four bids were opened and referred to the Fire Committee.

November 7, 1907 - The Fire Committee recommenced purchasing a Holloway combination chemical engine and hose wagon. Another company asked permission to present claims and present a bid. The matter was sent back to the Fire Committee.

December 5, 1907 - The Fire Committee did not recommend the Holloway engine, but one from the Robinson Fire Apparatus Manufacturing Co., Henry R. Early Selling Agent. This company would allow $600 for two chemical engines, etc. The price would be $1,786 with an allowance of $600.


1908

February 8, 1908 - One old chemical engine was shipped to Philadelphia.

July 2, 1908 - The Fire Committee reported the new engine was to be shipped, however, no provision had been made as to where it would be stored. Also, it was decided to give the new engine to the Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 until the new Town Hall would be finished.

August 6, 1908 - Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 asked for equipment. Also, the new chemical engine (A-1) was tested successfully. A motion was made to accept the new engine. The motion carried.

August 10, 1908 - Council reported the purchase of fireman(s equipment.

September 3, 1908 - Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 reported several options to buy land on which to erect a fire station. Also, 1,000 feet of fire hose was purchased at a cost of 80 cents per foot.

October 2, 1908 - Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 asked Council for a loan of $400 to buy land on which to erect a fire station. The matter was tabled.

November 5, 1908 - The Fire Committee informed Council that the Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 had rented quarters, and wanted Council action. A motion was passed that the Fire Committee should negotiate with A. O. Sheiry to ascertain in what way he would terminate the lease for the Fire Company rooms.

  

November 12, 1908 - A. O. Sheiry offered to erect a building suitable for the Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 (18' X 40'). He would have the building ready in four weeks and provide heat for a rent of $10 per month. Also, Ordinance #141 was presented which regulated the use of public buildings by the Volunteer Fire Company.


1909

January 7, 1909 - The Secretary was instructed to notify A. O. Sheiry to provide heat in the fire hall or Council would deduct the cost of heat from the rent. Also, Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 requested equipment and supplies.

March 4, 1909 - President J. W. Smith appointed a standing committee for the Fire Department - Milton Coleman, Edwin M. Smith and C. A. Smith.

March 8, 1909 - Coleman of the Fire Committee reported on the fire on Canal Street and reported that the overheated horses were in need of two woolen blankets. A motion was made to purchase the blankets.

April 1, 1909 - C. A. Smith intends to organize a fire team for the Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 and the driver should sleep in the building. As soon as someone is stationed at the building, they will install a telephone.

April 22, 1909 - Ordinance #146 was passed which authorized the purchase of a team of two horses, a set of harnesses and a suitable wagon for use by the Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1.

May 6, 1909 - A copy was placed on file of Form of Decree from Northampton County Court changing the name of the Borough from Alliance to Northampton. It was presented by the Secretary.

May 17, 1909 - Wiring in the Fire Company Hall was not satisfactory and the Fire Committee was going to investigate.

June 3, 1909 - Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 had electric service and when one fuse burns out, no lights work. John Miller was nominated as a driver of the Borough team of horses.

June 7, 1909 - An agreement dated June 8, 1904, with A. O. Sheiry for a room used by the Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1, in Sheiry(s Hall, was canceled.

June 8, 1909 - H. S. Rice thought there should be an investigation about drinking going on in the room of the Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1.

August 5, 1909 - C. A. Smith stated that Mr. Hunt, Chief of the Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 was present with an Anderson Improved Stop Nozzle and suggested that same be purchased. It was approved to purchase such a nozzle at a cost of $35.

August 23, 1909 - A letter was presented to Borough Council that a new nozzle would be made up for the Borough if the nozzle now is not satisfactory. Burgess Farber stated that he vetoed the purchase of a nozzle that was passed on August 5.

September 2, 1909 - Moved by Appel and Howell that the nozzle was to be purchased and action be taken on the vetoed resolution appropriating $35 for the purchase.

October 7, 1909 - Mr. Van Middleworth representing the Northampton Fire Company #1 asked Council for aid in securing a meeting place. Lawrence Co. could be leased or Miller property possibly could be bought. The Fire Company quarters should be referred to the Fire Committee and reported to Borough Council.

  

October 18, 1909 - The Fire Committee is looking for a suitable location for a fire hall. Lawrence Cement Co. offered to lease a piece of ground for 20 years at $1 per year. Also, Mr. Weitknecht offered a suitable lot with a rear entrance if necessary for $1. Moved to make arrangements to buy the lot from Mr. Weitknecht. The question of the fire hose was discussed. Moved by J. Rice and H. Rice to secure bids for 1,000 feet of fire hose, two plain nozzles and two Anderson nozzles. Moved that the Fire Committee and the Borough Engineer meet with Northampton Fire Company #1 to draw up plans and specifications for the 1st Ward Fire Hall.

November 4, 1909 - The majority of the Fire Company members opposed the purchase of the lot from Mr. Weitknecht. They reported the lot next to Mr. Jacob Hess(s double house could be purchased for $160. Burgess Farber stated that if the Weitknecht property was purchased, Mr. Porter of the Lawrence Portland Co. would carpet and furnish the second floor free of charge. The decision was made to take this under New Business at a later time. Also, the matter of awarding the contract for the fire hose should be laid over until the adjourned meeting.

November 11, 1909 - Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 asked for financial aid in purchasing a lot. There was a decision made to purchase fire hose from the Eureka Fire Hose Manufacturing Co. at 80 cents per foot for a sum of $800. 500 feet of fire hose was to be delivered to Central Fire Co. of the Second Ward and the remaining 500 feet to be retained by the Borough for delivery to the fire house to be built in the First Ward. The Borough has 30 days from the delivery date to test the hose. Moved that two straight nozzles also be bought from Eureka and that the coupling and thread be the same as now in use.

November 24, 1909 - Central Fire Co. asked for the use of the rear room second floor of the new Municipal building as the Fire Company(s meeting room. The request was granted.

December 2, 1909 - Northampton Fire Co. #1 asked Council to furnish hose and a meeting place. The Company also had a meeting and took a vote on the location, which resulted in 16 in favor of Weitknecht(s lot and 15 against. J. J. Rice presented the deed of the Weitknecht lot which was purchased for the First Ward Fire Co. The solicitor and the Fire Committee will meet with the committee of the Northampton Fire Co. #1 in reference to building and report at a special meeting.

December 6, 1909 - The Fire Committee and the Borough Engineer are to meet with the committee of the Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 to inspect the different locations, and for the Engineer to draw preliminary places for buildings and give rough estimates on First and Third Ward buildings, which are to be 25' X 55' and two stories.

December 16, 1909 - Savits of the Public Property Committee stated that the Committee had been to the Third Ward to look at locations for a fire hall and reported lots could be purchased as follow:

A. O. Sheiry Main St. between 7th & 8th St. $650

Mr. Neirman Main St. between 9th & 10th St. $500

P. N. Rummel 9th St. near Dewey Ave. $450

  

E. P. Kleppinger Washington Ave. between 7th & 8th St. $550

W. J. Kleppinger Washington Ave. between 7th & 8th St. $550

George Miller N. E. corner of 7th & Lincoln Ave. $350

H. R. Newhard Main and 6th St. $450

The majority favored either of the Kleppinger lots. Public Property Committee was instructed to investigate for best location and best price and report on it at the next meeting.

1910

January 6, 1910 - Central Fire Co. asked for fire apparatus and to have side entrance lights turned off at night. Bell Telephone was to be notified to place one free telephone in the quarters of the Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1. Fire hose was at the Northampton Station and Street Commissioner Bilheimer was instructed to bring hose to the Municipal Building. Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 decided on the first and second choice of lots for the fire hall.

January 13, 1910 - There was a motion to purchase the W. J. Kleppinger lot on the east side of Washington Ave. between 7th and 8th Streets for $550 for the Third Ward headquarters. Burgess Farber stated that he thought it was time for permanent quarters for the First and Third Ward fire companies. J. J. Rice suggested that the Fire Committee have the new hose tested at the Atlas Portland Cement Co.

January 20, 1910 - The fire hose was tested at the Atlas Portland Cement Co. and the test was satisfactory, throwing a stream of water a distance of 228 feet through a 1 1/8 inch nozzle. The test included a pressure of 300 lbs. for five minutes. The hose was accepted. Ordinance #160 appropriating $6,500 for the building of a fire hall in the First Ward was introduced and passed the first and second reading. Ordinance #161 appropriating $6,500 for building a fire hall in the Third Ward was introduced and passed the first and second reading. A motion was passed stating that the Fire Halls were to be built of cement blocks. J. J. Rice suggested that the common nozzle of the Third Ward be given to the Central Fire Co. until the new nozzle arrived. The President offered to attend to the matter.

February 3, 1910 - Eureka Fire Hose Manufacturing Co. sent a letter stating that the new nozzles would be shipped (as promptly as possible.( Messrs. Coleman and Savitz were to Allentown to see the hose carriages belonging to the Allentown Fire Department but thought they were too heavy.

February 8, 1910 - Council moved to advertise for bids for hose carts.

February 24, 1910 - Ordinance #159 authorizing the purchase of the W. J. Kleppinger lot was passed. Ordinance #160 and #161, authorizing construction of fire halls in the First and Third Wards respectively were passed. Bids for fire hose carriages were opened and tabled for review, laying the matter over until the regular meeting of March 3, 1910. Motion passed to advertise for bids for construction of 2 fire engine houses.

  

March 3, 1910 - F. H. Stettler, representing the Central Fire Co., asked which rooms Council expected to turn over to the fire company so they could (fix up( their quarters and make them more inviting. Also, the fire company requested the use of Council chambers for one night to hold a Fire Company Opening. The matter was referred to New Business. Contractor Zellner had asked the Borough Engineer for specifications for construction of the two fire halls but did not receive any until March 3, 1910 and thought the time was too short to submit a bid. The matter was referred to New Business. The meeting adjourned without reaching the New Business session.

March 5, 1910 - After a review of the bids for fire hall construction, a motion was made to award the bid for construction of the First Ward Fire Hall to John M. Campbell for $6,290 or $6,015 without a cell room. The motion was amended to read (to have a secret ballot.( The amended motion passed and the contract was awarded to J. M. Campbell. Also, a motion was made to award the bid for construction of the Third Ward Fire Hall to A. J. Best for $5,997 or $5,760 without a cell room. The motion was amended to read (to have a secret ballot.( The amended motion passed and the contract was awarded to A. J. Best. A motion to lay over the matter of fire apparatus was passed.

March 10, 1910 - The Fire Committee was appointed.  The members were Savitz, Kiechel and Howell. A motion was passed to have a Mr. Remmel prepare a deed for the W. J. Kleppinger lot. A motion was passed that the fire halls should be built in line with the existing buildings. A motion was passed that the cell rooms be built in the basements of both new fire halls.

April 7, 1910 - Coleman of the Public Property Committee reported excavation for both fire halls was nearly complete; however, at the First Ward site a sinkhole had reached a depth of 31 feet without striking rock. Ordinance #162 was introduced providing for the purchasing of two fire apparatuses. Smith wanted to know why Council was so anxious to get new equipment for the Alliance Fire Co. #1 when the company was satisfied with what it had.  (No response was recorded.)

April 15, 1910 - Motion passed that the Fire Committee secure a suitable wagon for temporary use in carrying hose for the Northampton Fire Co. and the Central Fire Co.

May 5, 1910 - Motion passed instructing the Fire Committee to get prices for fire engines and combination chemical and hook and ladder trucks by May 16, 1910.

May 16, 1910 - (Councilman Savitz died on or before April 11, 1910.) Newly appointed Councilman Lauer was placed on the Fire Committee. Motion passed to appropriate $1,000 for the purchase of fire apparatus. Ordinance #162 authorizing the purchase of fire apparatus was passed. Motion passed to advertise for bids for fire engine and hose truck for the Second Ward and a horse-driven or motor combination chemical and hose truck for the First Ward, bids to be in hand no later than 7:30 P. M. June 2, 1910.

May 23, 1910 - Secretary Bilheimer reported that the Central Fire Co. would like to have a letter box placed in the truck room door. Motion made and passed.

June 2, 1910 - Ordinance #166 authorizing the purchase of a chemical combination fire apparatus for the Third Ward Fire Hall was introduced and passed. Bids for fire apparatus were opened. A motion was passed to have the Borough Engineer tabulate bids and consider same at an adjourned meeting on June 9, 1910.

June 9, 1910 - Motion passed to lay over bids until meeting of July 7, 1910. A motion to re-advertise for bids for fire apparatus was defeated.

  

June 13, 1910 - Changes to outside stairwells to basements at the new Fire Halls were approved. Motion passed to make the first floor in the new Fire Halls (double instead of single.( Motion passed to place a concrete panel in the front of the new Fire Halls with the inscription (Fire House #1" and (Fire House #3" at a cost of $10 per hall.

July 7, 1910 - Motion passed postponing the purchase of fire apparatus. Reason listed was (on account of dissatisfaction.(

July 12, 1910 - Rice reported that the First Ward Fire Hall was not being built according to specifications. The Borough Engineer was to look into the matter.

July 18, 1910 - A motion passed establishing the paint color scheme of the First and Third Ward Fire Halls. The color was to be identical to the Municipal Building. Ordinance #172 repealing Ordinance #162 was passed. Ordinance #173 repealing Ordinance #166 was passed.

August 4, 1910 - Engineer reported that the contractor had started plastering at the First Ward Fire Hall. Partitions were being installed at the Third Ward Fire Hall and the cesspool at that site was 27 feet deep. Motion passed to secure bids to place towers on the new Fire Halls.

August 12, 1910 - Reviewed and rejected all bids for towers at First and Third Ward Fire Halls. Motion passed to purchase 3 Standard Recording Gauges, on for each fire house, at $31.50 each.

September 1, 1910 - The Secretary reported that the deed for the W. J. Kleppinger lot was ready but $545 remained due on the purchase of the property. Motion passed to pay the remainder.

October 6, 1910 - Motion passed directing the Street and Engineering Committee to see the grading around the First and Third Ward Fire Halls. Motion passed that the Secretary notify contractors to meet all specifications on the Fire Hall construction. Bachman requested a bell tower on the Third Ward Fire Hall. (No response was recorded.) Motion passed to allow the Central Fire Co. to use the Council chambers on October 14, 1910.

November 3, 1910 - Lauer suggested that something be done to have the new Fire Halls completed. Engineer reported two weeks to completion.

November 16, 1910 - Motion passed that brackets for hose racks for the new Fire Halls be made of 1/4" X 1 1/4" iron per specifications.

December 1, 1910 - Engineer reported that the First Ward Fire Hall was complete except for hose racks and a flag pole. At the Third Ward Fire Hall, a planning mill was working on the stairways and the contractor could not get white pine for the flagpole per specifications. Motion passed to use spruce instead of white pine for the flagpole.

  

1911

January 5, 1911 - Public Property Committee reported that the First Ward Fire Hall had been accepted with one exception, namely, the contractor used yellow pine in the front room of the second floor instead of cypress as specified. $629.50 was retained from J. M. Campbell, the contractor. Matter was referred to the Public Property Committee. The Engineer reported that the Third Ward Fire Hall was ready for paint. Lauer reported that a telephone had been promised to the Central Fire Co. and it should be attended to.

January 19, 1911 - Engineer reported for the Public Property Committee that J. M. Campbell submitted a bill for $6,295, the amount of the contract for the First Ward Fire Hall, plus $232.20 for extras and it was accepted with the following exceptions:

$74.50 for change of height.

Contractor allowance of $15 for using yellow pine instead of cypress in the second floor front room.

Engineer reported the building complete except for one coat of paint in the bathroom and door to the side entrance. He suggested Council retain $50 until painting is complete. Motion passed to have the Solicitor draw up an indemnity bond and have it executed before the balance is paid. Motion passed to refer the matter of the telephone for the Central Fire Co. to the Telephone and Telegraph Committee. Motion passed to place tablets in the new Fire Halls. Motion passed to return a bill from Campbell for extras claimed by L. J. Stofflet amounting to $267.22 to Campbell.

January 26, 1911 - After meeting with the contractor, sub-contractor and block manufacturer and after much discussion regarding the size of the block changing the height of the building, a motion was passed to accept Mr. Campbell(s offer to pay him in full, except $50 was to be retained until painting was completed. Motion passed to approve the indemnity bond given by Campbell. Lauer reported the Third Ward Fire Hall was nearly completed, all but painting. Nothing definite had been stated by Mr. Best, the contractor, as to when it would be turned over to Council. Motion passed granting permission to Northampton Fire Co. #1 to occupy the First Ward Fire Hall. Motion passed authorizing the Public Property and Engineering Committee to prepare plans and specifications for heating and lighting the two halls.

February 2, 1911 - A letter was received from W. W. Hunt, Chief of Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1, asking for 4 pairs of rubber gloves. He notified Council that the Company had elected 6 Fire Police and questioned whether Council would swear them in and provide Fire Police badges. Engineer received a request from A. J. Best to inspect the Third Ward Fire Hall that day, but was but was unable to do so. Motion passed to purchase 18 pairs of rubber gloves for the different Fire Companies. Motion passed to lay over bids for lighting and heating at the two new Fire Halls. While fighting a fire at the Atlas Portland Company(s stone house, the Fire Co. had borrowed some hose from Jacob Wenner and (one section was busted.( Motion passed to have the Fire Committee handle the matter.

February 16, 1911 - Bids for heating and lighting for the new Fire Halls were opened. Motion passed to lay over bids for an adjourned meeting and instructed the Engineer to tabulate all bids.

  

February 21, 1911 - Following a secret ballot, a 2 boiler steam heating system and installation contract was awarded to C. J. Laudenslager. The bid was for $1,421. (Editor’s note: The minutes never specified if this price was for both Halls or for one only.) The Solicitor was instructed to prepare the bond at once. Motion passed stating that the lighting fixtures for the two Fire Halls should be of a 22 gauge oxidized round tubing. Motion passed awarding the contract to Messrs. Kuntz and Hoagland for $83.50 for each building.

March 2, 1911 - A factory representative and Laudenslager reported the bond would soon be ready. Lauer reported the Public Property Committee had inspected the Third Ward Fire Hall and found the wall of the side entrance and the floor of the cell room were cracked. The front door was not complete and the bars to the cell room had not been fastened. Following an inspection by the Engineer, a letter was sent to the Public Property Committee informing them officially of the deficiencies at the new Hall and remarking that these were the same deficiencies noted during his inspection on February 25, 1911. Motion passed that the Solicitor should draw up an indemnity bond for $6,039 for the Third Ward Fire Hall.

March 7, 1911 - C. J. Laudenslager presented the Agreement and Bond for installation of heating plants at both new Halls. Motion passed to accept as amended, i.e. (Steam Heating System( instead of (Hot Water System.(

March 23, 1911 - The Central Fire Co., represented by E. J. Royer and H. F. Newhard, submitted a list of materials for equipping the company. The list included:

Combination hook, ladder and hose truck to carry 1,000 feet of 2 1/2" fire hose

6 rubber hats

6 rubber coats

6 pair of rubber boots

2 steel hexagon bars

2 combination tin roof cutters and plaster hooks

6 Dietz fire lanterns

2 extension ladders

500 feet of hose

1 spray nozzle

2 pick head axes

2 leather buckets

Motion passed to furnish the Central Fire Co. the list of materials requested and that a four wheel truck be procured for the Northampton Fire Co. Also, the Fire Committee was instructed to advertise for bids to be submitted on or before April 13, 1911.

April 6, 1911 - William Berg, representing the Northampton Fire Co. #1 asked for equipment including an automobile chemical engine. Lauer reported that the Public Property Committee had inspected the heating plant at the First Ward Fire Hall and had accepted same.

April 18, 1911 - Ordinance #186 providing for the purchase of a chemical combination hook and ladder fire apparatus, and appropriating $5,000 for said purchase was introduced. Ordinance #187 providing for the purchase of 200 feet of fire hose for each of the three fire companies was introduced. Agreement for wiring and light fixtures at the new Fire Halls was presented by Messrs. Kuntz and Hoagland and was accepted by motion.

  

April 27, 1911 - The Engineer for the Public Property Committee reported a bill of A. J. Best for extras and balance at the Third Ward Fire Hall was presented in the amount of $1,808.52. Best was willing to allow $83.52 leaving a balance of $1,725. Best also presented an indemnity bond. Motion passed to approve the bond. Motion passed to accept the Third Ward Fire Hall. Motion passed to pay A. J. Best the $1,725 balance due him. Motion passed granting Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. #1 permission to occupy Fire House #3.

May 4, 1911 - The Public Property Committee had inspected the lighting fixtures at the First Ward Fire Hall and accepted same. Motion passed to erect a concrete retaining wall at Fire House No. 1 and Fire House No. 3 at an estimated cost of $43.

May 11, 1911 - The owner of the property abutting Fire House No. 3, Charles Muth, stated he would allow a retaining wall with an iron fence on top to be built on the property line and would pay some of the cost. Motion passed to have the Engineer and Public Property Committee look into the matter. Rice reported that the First Ward Fire Hall (had been very nicely furnished by Mr. Chas. A. Porter, Supt. Of the Lawrence Portland Cement Co.( Motion passed to order shades for both new Houses. Motion passed to have the Public Property Committee see to stabling horses at Fire House No. 3.

June 1, 1911 - Three petitions were presented, one from each Ward, requesting equipping the Fire Houses with the best up-to-date fire apparatus. The petitions were signed by 75 citizens from the First Ward, 138 citizens from the Second Ward and 40 citizens from the Third Ward. Central Fire Co. requested the appointment of Walter Bortz as Fire Police. Mr. Cross of the Gamewell Fire Alarm and Telegraph System attended and explained the workings of the system. He presented the approximate cost of an up-to-date system (something less than $5,000.( Ordinance #186 authorizing the purchase of fire apparatus was passed. Ordinance #187 authorizing the purchase of fire hose was passed. Motion passed to advertise for a combination hose, hook and ladder truck, both horse drawn and motor driven. Bids were to be in the hands of the Secretary no later than June 12, 1911. Motion passed to advertise for bids for fire hose. Bids were to be in the hands of the Secretary no later than June 12, 1911. Motion passed to convert the cell room in Fire House #3 into a stable for the Borough(s horses. Motion passed to insure Fire House #1 with contents and Fire House #3 with contents for $4,500 with Squire E. J. Bernhardt. Motion passed to lay over review of bids for shades for the Fire Houses until the next meeting.

  

June 12, 1911 - A petition against the purchase of a motor driven combination chemical and hose truck, signed by 117 citizens, was presented. Motion passed to accept the petition. Bids were opened for fire apparatus. Motion passed that all bids for fire apparatus be tabulated for the next meeting. Bids for fire hose were opened. Motion passed that Council go into executive session and allow each representative 5 minutes to explain the merits of their apparatus and hose. Following that session, a motion passed awarding a contract to the Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co. for 600 feet of the Rescue brand at 85 cents per foot. Bids were opened for window shades at Fire House No. 1 and No. 3. Motion passed awarding contract to Ritter and Borger at $33 complete for the two Houses. Motion passed to advertise for bids for equipment asked for by the Central Fire Co. (some time ago.( Motion passed that the Solicitor draw up a contract and bond amounting to $500 covering fire hose purchased from the Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co.

July 3, 1911 - Motion passed to award contract for tablets at Fire Houses No. 1 and No. 3 to W. S. Tyler Co. at $185 complete for both Houses. Contractors Campbell and Best offered to donate $5 each to have their names included on the tablets.

July 6, 1911 - Received a petition signed by 174 property owners, sworn to by Chief Burgess, asking for the purchase of on combination chemical hose, hook and ladder truck. Motion passed to receive petition. Lauer of the Public Property Committee reported the lighting fixtures at Fire House #3 were not satisfactory, there were some gas leaks. Motion passed to purchase one motor driven combination chemical hose, hook and ladder truck. Motion passed to place the new truck in the Municipal Building in the care of the Central Fire Co. Motion passed that an order be placed with the Pope Hartford Sales Agency of Philadelphia for one motor driven combination chemical hose, hook and ladder truck, price to be $5,000.

July 11, 1911 - Received a letter from the Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co. That company refused to sign the Articles of Agreement drawn up by the Borough(s Solicitor for the purchase of 600 feet of fire hose. Motion passed to countermand the order placed with the Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co. and to re-advertise for bids, Articles of Agreement to be furnished by the Secretary to each bidder and in the hands of the Secretary no later than 7:30 P. M. July 20, 1911. Bids for equipment for the Central Fire Co. were opened. Motion passed to tabulate bids for an adjourned meeting to be held on July 20, 1911. Motion passed to have the Bell Telephone Co. place a telephone in Fire House #1. Motion passed to have the contents of Fire House #3 insured for $1,500 and the horses with (some Live Stock Insurance Co.(, the matter to be handled by the Public Property Committee.

July 20, 1911 - Motion passed to award contract for equipment for the Central Fire Co. to Woodhouse Mfg. Co. and that the Fire Committee get a list of supplies required by the Northampton Fire Co. and include it in the order. Motion passed to award a contract for fire hose to Voorhees Rubber Mfg. Co. for 600 feet of Fire Model brand hose at a cost of 90 cents per foot.

August 3, 1911 - Voorhees Mfg. Co. returned the bond, amount $500, properly executed. Lauer reported a lot of hay was being wasted at Fire House #3 because there were no hay racks for the stable. Motion passed to refer the matter to the Public Property Committee.

August 14, 1911 - Woodhouse Mfg. Co. pointed out that the threads of the Borough(s hose connection were not in accordance with the standard of the manufacturer of the Callahan nozzle and the company would not send a nozzle on approval. Secretary was instructed to write to Woodhouse Mfg. Co. and ascertain whether they can furnish the Anderson nozzle instead of the Callahan nozzle. Motion passed to have extra equipment for the Central Fire Co(s auto truck given into the hands of the Fire Committee.

  

September 7, 1911 - Motion passed to have the Public Property Committee look into the matter of a request of Alliance Vol. Fire Co. #1 for the purchase of a swing harness. Lauer reported all of the Fire Company supplies had been received.

October 10, 1911 - Chairman Lauer of the Fire Committee reported the new chemical hose, hook and ladder automobile truck had been received and tested. All seems to be in accordance with specifications. Slight trouble with the chemical tank was blamed on lack of experience. Motion passed to accept the unit. Motion passed to turn the unit over to the Central Fire Co. Motion passed authorizing the Chief of the Central Fire Co. to select a man to run the new unit. Bachman, for the Alliance Vol. Fire Co. #1 asked for a janitor for Fire House #3. Matter was referred to the Street and Engineering Committee. Motion passed making the Public Property Committee responsible for removing the stalls at the Municipal Building. Motion passed to install a telephone in the residence of the Chief. Motion passed that the Borough pay the bill for an extension bell in the residence of the Alliance Vol. Fire Co. Chief.

November 2, 1911 - Motion passed referring request of the Central Fire Co., to place a fire bell in the tower of the Municipal Building to be used as a fire alarm, to the Public Property Committee.

November 16, 1911 - Lauer asked the Engineer to report dimensions of opening between pillars in the tower in order to (act intelligently in getting information for a fire alarm bell.( (Editor(s note: Engineer had already done this. Measurements were 50 inches and 52 inches.) The Secretary was instructed to obtain information from bell manufacturers.

December 7, 1911 - President asked why excavation in the basement of Fire House #3 was not completed. Engineer answered it was the intention to install a urinal in the basement but (the Public Property Committee did not see its way clear to proceed.( Motion passed authorizing the Public Property Committee to purchase a set of snow chains for the Auto Fire Truck. Motion passed to have the Secretary inform representatives of bell companies to be at an adjourned meeting, the date to be established later.

December 28, 1911 - Woodhouse Mfg. Co. reported the double set of harness for Alliance Vol. Fire Co. #1 had been received and forwarded to the factory. (?) Engineer reported the urinal in Fire House #3 was completed and a concrete slab would go in (to-morrow.( Snow chains for the auto truck were received and installed. Motion passed to buy one (1) 1,000 lb. bell from the McShane Bell Foundry Co., Baltimore. A Resolution was passed appropriating $350 for the purchase of the bell. (Editor(s note - The balance of the contract with C. J. Laudenslager was paid on December 28, 1911. The total amount paid from date of awarding contract for two heating systems was $1,429.50, so the price listed earlier was for both Fire Houses combined.)

  

December 29, 1911 - Motion passed to reconsider action of December 28, 1911 regarding purchase of bell from McShane Bell Foundry Co. Motion passed to rescind the order purchasing the bell. Telegram bids for one (1) 1,000 lb. bell were reviewed. Motion passed to purchase said bell from McShane Bell Foundry Co., Baltimore, MD., F. O. B. Northampton for $315. Resolution passed supporting the purchase of the bell. Motion passed accepting the Resolution. Resolution passed authorizing the Chairman of the Public Property Committee to telegraph the McShane Bell Foundry Co. notifying them of the Borough(s acceptance of their bid and to furnish and ship immediately by freight, one (1) 1,000 lb. bell and necessary mountings. Motion passed to approve Resolution.

1912

January 4, 1912 - The Burgess, in his report, called for the installation of the Gamewell Auxiliary Fire Alarm System. Motion passed to advertise in The Cement News for a teamster and a janitor for Fire House #3.

January 16, 1912 – The Fire Committee was appointed and the members were Harvey Silfies, H. F. Newhard and H. W. Newhard. Central Fire Co. represented by E. J. Royer and E. M. Silfies proposed to Council that Council confer with a committee of the Central Fire Co. before appointing a janitor and an operator for the fire apparatus. Royer stated that as far as he knew the Central Fire Co. and the other two companies were desirous that Council adopt an Ordinance regulating the conduct of the companies at fires and rules governing the care of the equipment. By nomination and vote of Council, Frank Fogel was elected Janitor and Teamster at Fire House #3 at $60 per month. Motion passed to lay over the election of a janitor for Fire House #1 and place the matter in the hands of the proper committee. Motion passed to pick up the fire bell at the Northampton Station and (the proper committee shall take charge of same.( Motion passed to pick up harness for Alliance Vol. Fire Co. and remove it to Fire House #3.

January 25, 1912 - Report was presented that the janitor for the Municipal Building and the driver of the fire engine should be the same person and should be on duty from 9 A.M. to 9 P.M., and on call from 9 P.M. to 9 A.M. If he wished to leave town he must secure his own supply. The salary would be between $60 and $70 per month and the Central Fire Company should recommend a man. Motion passed to receive the report. Resolution was passed to hire a janitor and chauffeur for the Municipal Building, hours to be 9 A.M. to 9 P.M., except on nights when Council met, when he must stay until the Council meeting is over. He must answer calls at his residence by telephone and he must perform all duties as janitor at the Municipal Building. His pay will be $65 per month. Motion passed that the Public Works Committee receive sealed bids for the installation of the fire bell.

  

February 1, 1912 - A petition was presented, signed by 55 citizens, protesting placing a permanent janitor and motor truck man in the Municipal Building. Burgess Farber outlined in a communication why he was opposed to a permanent janitor and driver. A water pipe at Fire House #1 had burst and was repaired. Hanging harness at Fire House #3 had been fixed. Secretary for Central Fire Co. asked to have the light switch moved to a more convenient location. Motion passed to award contract to install the fire bell in the Municipal Building tower to Monroe Miller & Son for $35 to $44, to include materials. Motion passed to hire George W. Berg as janitor at Fire House #1 for $12 per month. Motion passed to receive the petition presented against placing a permanent janitor and truckman in the Municipal Building. Motion passed to receive communication from the Burgess relating to the janitor position at the Municipal Building. Motion passed that the (janitorship of the Municipal Building remain same as last year.( Motion passed to receive bids for janitor for Municipal Building by the next regular meeting.

February 21, 1912 - Motion passed to approve bond offered by Monroe Miller & Son for installing the fire alarm bell.

March 7, 1912 - Newhard of the Public Property Committee stated that the fire bell had been installed. Motion passed to lay the election of a janitor for the Municipal Building over to the March 12, 1912 meeting. Hawk asked (whether an election could be held with the primary election with reference to Fire Alarm system.( (Editor(s note - No response was recorded.)

March 12, 1912 - By vote of Council, C. C. Bilheimer was elected janitor of the Municipal Building, to be paid $28 per month.

April 11, 1912 - Newhard reported one of the horses at Fire House #3 was sick and unable to work. He suggested an exchange or sale. Motion passed to have the Public Property Committee take this matter in hand and report at the next meeting.

April 16, 1912 - Motion passed to turn the fire alarm bell over to the Central Fire Co. Motion passed allowing Central Fire Co. to take the auto truck to the Four County Fireman(s parade in Bethlehem in June.

May 2, 1912 - Newhard of the Public Property Committee reported that the horse offered for use of the Borough was examined by the veterinarian and found to be sound. Mr. Stephens wanted $325 for it and (is willing to pay as much for the horse to be displaced as anyone else.( Resolution passed to buy the horse from Mr. Stephens for $325 and that the Public Property Committee be authorized to sell the old horse (for the best price that can be gotten for the same.( Motion passed to have the Public Property Committee, with the authority to act, investigate the complaint that the stable door at Fire House #3 is too narrow and dangerous to the horses.

May 9, 1912 - Matter of the stable door at Fire House #3 was given into the hands of the Engineer. Newhard reported the horse was sold for $110. Motion passed to have the Public Property Committee prepare the rear room of the first floor of the Municipal Building to be ready for occupancy.

June 6, 1912 - Newhard of the Public Property Committee reported bids had been received for the doors at Fire House #3. Rupp stated Charles Muth complained that no fence had been placed on the wall between his property and Fire House #3 as promised. Engineer stated the wall was completely on the Fire Co. property and that he knew of no promise to Mr. Muth about a fence. Necessity for a fence must be determined by Council. Motion passed to refer the Muth fence matter to the Public Property Committee. Motion passed awarding contract for alterations at Fire House #3 to J. M. Campbell for $170.

June 13, 1912 - Motion passed to accept the bond of J. M. Campbell for the contract at Fire House #3.

  

July 1, 1912 - Motion passed allowing the three Fire Cos. to serve lunch and refreshments to visiting organizations in the basements of their respective Fire Houses. Motion passed to sign bond and forward a copy to J. M. Campbell.

July 11, 1912 - Oscar Newhard, representing Northampton Fire Co. #1, requested the removal of ashes from the basement, and stated that they needed globes and better fire apparatus (in the shape of a chemical truck.( Silfies reported the Fire Committee had purchased a spring wagon for Northampton Fire Co. #1, for $85 and that hooks had been placed on the side to carry ladders. Motion passed to have the Public Property Committee consider erecting a shed behind Fire House #3 to store hay.

July 18, 1912 - Motion passed to transfer insurance to the new Borough horse and renew it for one year.

August 1, 1912 - Discussed proposition of building a wagon shed at Fire House #3.

August 8, 1912 - Rupp requested that Council pay part of the telephone rental for Chief W. W. Hunt of the Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. Request laid over for action at next meeting.

September 5, 1912 - Ross Lauer, foreman of the Central Fire Co., requested more hose, a plug attachment to allow more than one hose connection at a time without shutting off the plug and another Anderson nozzle. Motion passed to advertise for 500 feet of 2 ( inch hose. Silfies expressed an opinion favoring an Ordinance providing for a Fire Chief and the regulation of the Fire Department. Motion passed instructing the Fire Committee to get prices on plug attachments. Motion passed to buy an Anderson nozzle for the Central Fire Co.

September 16, 1912 - Silfies was informed by members of the Alliance Vol. Fire Co. that the horses were not fit for use as fire horses. Matter was left in the hands of the Public Property Committee.

October 3, 1912 - Motion passed to have the Public Property Committee, with the power to act, investigate the Borough(s horses. Bids for fire hose were reviewed. Several motions to buy were entered and lost.

November 4, 1912 - Motion passed to buy 500 feet of Rescue Brand hose from the Gutta Percha Hose Co. at a cost of 85 cents per foot.

November 7, 1912 - Communication from the Alliance Vol. Fire Co. was received asking for gas lights for the truck and that Fire Police be sworn in, that they may act with authority. Matter referred to the Fire Committee. Newhard reported having sold the Borough horse deemed unsound for $25. Motion passed to have the Fire Committee look into getting lights for the Alliance Vol. Fire Co. truck. Motion passed to order three hydrant gates. Engineer reported the fence between Fire House #3 and Mr. Muth(s property was removed and used elsewhere by Muth and the wall is erected entirely on Borough property. Public Property Committee was instructed to look into the matter.

  

December 5, 1912 - Alliance Vol. Fire Co. requested Council to provide a gas heater and boiler for the bathroom in Fire House #3. Newhard of the Public Property Committee had met with Mr. Muth. Muth wanted a fence between his property and the Fire House. Motion passed instructing the Public Property Committee to have a fence erected at Fire House #3, (the Committee to exercise its judgment as to kind.( Public Property Committee was instructed to investigate bathroom needs at Fire House #3 and report.


1913

January 2, 1913 - Newhard reported that the doors at Alliance fire Hall could not be opened. The matter was referred to the Engineer. Motion passed to accept the bond of the Gutta Percha Rubber & Mfg. Co. Motion passed to allow Central Fire Co. to use the Council room on January 15, 1913. Motion passed to advertise in The Morning Call for a janitor for the different Fire Houses.

January 10, 1913 - George Newhard was elected janitor of Fire House #1 at $12 per month. J. J. Rice was elected janitor at the Municipal Building at $26 per month. Frank Fogel offered to serve as janitor and driver at Fire House #3 for $60 per month. Motion passed to lay over his bid until the next regular meeting. C. C. Bilheimer asked to be relieved as janitor at once. Motion passed to pay him the amount due.

February 6, 1913 - Hunt of the Alliance Vol. Fire Co. reported the Company decided they were satisfied with the present equipment. Motion passed to hire a janitor and teamster by the month for as many months as he is needed. Motion passed to hire Frank Fogel by the month at $60 per month. Ordinance #227 was introduced providing for dividing the Borough into three (3) fire districts, appointing a Chief of the Fire Department and defining his duties and providing for his compensation. Ordinance #228 was introduced providing for the appointment of Fire Police and defining their duties. Ordinance #229 was introduced providing for the appointment of firemen and drivers. Motion passed to accept resignation of George Newhard as janitor of Fire House #1. Public Property Committee was instructed to see to the request concerning different arrangements for the use of the horse at Fire House #3. George Berg was elected janitor at Fire House #1.

February 13, 1913 - H. F. Newhard reported that H. E. Newhard wants 50 cents per day for use of his horse at Fire House #3, when it is not working and $1 per day when it is working. Fire Committee was instructed to have the fire hose tested.

March 6, 1913 - Fire Committee reported a successful testing of the fire hose.

April 3, 1913 - Solicitor reported the Ordinance pertaining to the Fire Department had been changed to meet the desire of Council. (Editor’s note: Probably Ordinance #229, Assistant Chief added.) Ordinance #227 was passed. Ordinance #228 was passed. Ordinance #229 was passed.

April 10, 1913 - Ross Lauer was elected Chief of the Fire Department. Question was raised whether the Chief could be elected before the Ordinance was properly advertised. Solicitor said the Ordinance must be advertised first. Motion passed to reconsider the election of Lauer as Chief of the Fire Department. Motion passed that the Fire Committee shall receive applications for Chief and Assistant Chief of the Fire Department as well as Fire Police, for review at the next meeting.

May 1, 1913 - On the sixth ballot of Council, W. W. Hunt was elected Chief of the Fire Department. No nominations were received for Assistant Chief so “the matter was dropped.”

June 5, 1913 - Motion passed to allow the Central Fire Co. to take the Automobile truck to Easton for the Four County Fireman’s Parade on June 21, 1913. Chief Hunt reported that he had visited the different Fire Houses and found everything satisfactory. There were no fire calls during the month of May. Silfies inquired if the Council would buy a hat with the words “Fire Chief” printed thereon, or did the Chief have to buy his own hat. Information was provided that unless the Ordinance provided for a hat, the Chief must buy it himself.

July 3, 1913 - Fire chief Hunt reported:

Central Fire Co. auto truck was called out on June 10, 1913 to a fire at L. F. Snyder’s.

Auto truck was called out on July 1, 1913 to the Atlas plant where hay in a field was burning.

Ashes in Fire House #1 were not yet removed.

Requested two (2) inner tubes for the auto truck.

Requested purchase of an “automatic jack” for the auto truck

Motion passed to buy inner tubes from W. H. Danner for $10.25.

July 8, 1913 - It was decided to have the policy for horse insurance cancelled. Motion passed to refer Chief Hunt’s request for jacks for the auto truck to the Fire Committee.

August 7, 1913 - Motion passed electing Fire Police as follows:

2nd Ward – T. A. Kleppinger, E. M. Silfies, P. A. Smith, S. D. Smith, W. R. Rabenold

3rd Ward – George Hahn, George Nicholas, Monroe Miller, Jr., Robert Hepner, John Moyer

Chief Hunt was called to the Zellner row on Washington Avenue on July 11, 1913. There was no need to call out the Company. The Fire Department was appealed to for help on July 24, 1913 for a fire in Cementon. The Chief reported the Central Fire Co. responded on August 7, 1913 when Mr. Greene’s automobile caught fire. The Chief requested instructions concerning service at out-of-town fires. The Solicitor did not recommend action by Council concerning service at out-of-town fires. Motion passed to approve the report of the Fire Chief.

September 4, 1913 - Central Fire Co. communicated that Robert Klotz had been elected foreman of the Company and asked for confirmation of that selection by Council. Council elected Robert Klotz as foreman of the Central Fire Co. Chief Hunt reported visiting the three Fire Houses and all was satisfactory.

September 18, 1913 - Bids for coal for the different Fire Houses were opened and rejected. Motion passed to have the Public Property Committee order coal for the Fire Houses whenever necessary. H. F. Newhard asked what had been done about obtaining jacks for the auto truck. (Editor’s note: No response was listed.) Motion passed to move the telephone from the residence of Mr. Lauer to the barber shop of the Central Fire Co. foreman, Robert Klotz.

October 2, 1913 - Fire Chief Hunt reported Alliance Fire Co. responded to a call at the Shaffer fire on E. 10th Street. He also requested three more lanterns for the Alliance Fire Co. He stated there should be more rubber coats and boots for use at fires. An inspection of the three fire Houses showed all to be satisfactory. Motion passed to refer Chief Hunt’s request for equipment to the Fire Committee, to report at the next meeting.

November 6, 1913 - Fire Chief Hunt reported a fire call on October 16, 1913 and “that same day the auto truck was injured instructing a new man.” Also, an inspection of the three Fire Houses showed all to be satisfactory.

December 5, 1913 - Fire Chief Hunt reported the Alliance Fire Co. truck was called out on November 25, 1913 to extinguish a fire on the old Coplay bridge. The Company responded but did not go into service. An inspection of the three Fire Houses showed all to be satisfactory.


1914

January 15, 1914 - Motion passed to advertise for janitors at the three Fire Houses. Motion passed fixing the salaries of the janitors as follows:

Fire House #1 - $12 per month

Municipal Building - $30 per month

Fire House #3 - Janitor and team driver - $60 per month

Motion passed to advertise for bids for janitor and teamster. Motion passed allowing the Central Fire Co. use of the Council chambers for their annual banquet and social on January 29, 1914.

February 6, 1914 - Fire Chief Hunt reported that the Fire Department responded to a call on January 21, 1914. The Alliance Fire Co. was unable to reach the Central Fire Co. because they had already left for the fire. The Fire Committee was in receipt of a recommendation from the Central Fire Co. asking council for confirmation of Ross Lauer as driver of the auto truck, stating he wanted $10 per month and a telephone in his residence for alarm purposes. Motion was lost to adopt Chief Hunt’s recommendation. Milton Kuntz was elected janitor of Fire House #1, J. J. Rice was elected janitor of the Municipal Building. Frank Fogel was elected janitor and teamster of Fire House #3. Motion passed that the Secretary notify the Central Fire Co. that its proposition was rejected. Motion was lost to prepare and pass a Resolution to hire a driver and janitor at the Municipal Building for $50 per month.

March 5, 1914 - Public Property Committee reported that the valves and radiators in Fire House #1 were out of order. Fire Chief Hunt reported no fire calls and all three Fire Houses were in order.

March 19, 1914 - Matter of tires on auto truck being in very poor condition was referred to the Fire Committee. Motion passed to have the Public Property Committee investigate safety valves for Fire House #1. New janitor at Fire House #1 reported last year’s janitor had not removed the ashes from the basement and it was not his responsibility to do so. The Supervisor was instructed to take the Borough team and remove the ashes. It was reported that the iron fence at Fire House #1 was not put up. Matter was referred to Public Property Committee.

April 2, 1914 - Fire Chief Hunt reported no fire calls. All three Fire Houses were in order, although there were still problems with the tires on the auto truck.

April 14, 1914 - Fire Chief Hunt stated there was something wrong at Fire House #3, that conditions were not at all satisfactory and that the various Committees should instruct the teamster as to his duties.

May 7, 1914 - Fire Chief Hunt reported no fire calls during the previous month. During routine inspection of Fire House #1, it was noted conditions were not satisfactory. It seemed the janitor was at fault. Several doors and locks were not in working order. Conrad of the Public Property Committee reported the condition of Fire House #1 was such that it is hardly advisable to keep the building open. Lindenmoyer reported there was neither equipment, nor any sign of it and as President of the Company, guaranteed if equipment was ordered, things would improve. A representative of the Webb Motor Fire Engine Co. offered Council a new auto fire engine for $7,000. Beil of the Fire Committee said he saw the engine, but it was not equipped. However, he thought it was a good machine, but favored chemical tanks. Motion passed to offer $5,000 for the engine, fully and satisfactorily equipped with self-starter, section hose and chemical tank for Fire House #3. W. W. Hunt was re-elected Fire Chief by Council vote of 7 to 2, defeating J. M. Campbell.

May 14, 1914 - Outside light at Fire House #1 was reported not operating and should be repaired before someone fell down the stairs. A representative of the Trustees of the Webb Auto Fire Apparatus Co. was present to ask Council if they would be willing to increase their offer, in view of the fact that it would cost at least $500 to equip the unit per Council’s instruction.

May 21, 1914 - Silfies stated that if the Alliance Vol. Fire Co. is getting an auto truck, the teamster should be given notice. No action was taken.

June 4, 1914 - W. F. Rabenold, a representative of the Swinehart Tire & Rubber Co. spoke about cushion tires for the auto truck. Conrad of the Public Property Committee reported repairs were made at Fire House #1. Fire Chief Hunt reported no fire calls during the month of May. An inspection of the Fire Houses revealed that Fire House #1 was in better shape. He also reported the test of the “triple auto engine was entirely satisfactory.” A Resolution was adopted to purchase the Webb Auto Engine for the sum of $5,000 from Robert Wilbur, trustee in bankruptcy of the Webb Automobile Co. Motion passed to have the Fire Committee attend to lettering the new auto truck. Action was deferred on tires for the Central auto truck, pending further information.

June 29, 1914 - Motion passed to discontinue services of the teamster and janitor at Fire House #3 effective the evening of June 30, 1914. Motion passed to have the Public Property Committee sell the Borough horse for the best price possible. Motion passed that the salary of the janitor at Fire House #3 should be $15 per month, to include cleaning and polishing the new truck.

July 2, 1914 - Conrad reported the horse had been placed with J. M. Newhard, the intention being to place the horse on sale at Stephen’s next horse sale. Also, he inquired whether the Public Property Committee should advertise wagons, harnesses, etc. Fire Committee had attended to lettering. Fire Chief Hunt reported no fire calls during June. He inspected the Fire Houses and found them in satisfactory order. The shoes of the Central truck were in fair shape and the new auto truck might be delivered next week. After two even ballots for position of janitor at Fire House #3 (between B. F. Young and Frank Boyer), the matter was laid over to the next meeting. Motion passed confirming Jacob Lesher, Jr. as driver and engineer of the new auto truck of the Alliance Vol. Fire Co., and H. E. Newhard and George Nicholas, assistants. Motion passed allowing the Central Fire Co. to take the auto truck to Catasauqua for a parade. Motion passed to have the Public Property Committee dispose of excess equipment of Alliance Vol. Fire Co. at a public sale at Fire House #3.

July 9, 1914 - Conrad of the Public Property Committee stated the horse would be sold on July 10, 1914. The date of sale of wagons and other property had not yet been set. The Committee had received an estimate for reinforcement of the truck floor at Fire House #3. B. F. Young was elected janitor at Fire House #3. Bachman of the Fire Committee reported the Webb Motor Co. was installing the self-starter on the Alliance auto truck and the truck would probably be delivered “next week.” Ross Lauer was elected Assistant Fire Chief. J. M. Campbell offered to strengthen the floor of the Alliance Fire House in compliance with specifications for $53.

July 29, 1914 - Mr. Fulmer, representing the receiver of the Webb Motor Co., stated that the self-starter for the Alliance auto truck was not operating properly. His orders were to return with a check or the truck. He suggested council provide a check for $1,000, not to be cashed until the truck was returned in “A 1 order.” Motion passed to make a conditional payment of $1,000.

August 6, 1914 - Assistant Fire Chief Lauer thanked Council for the honor conferred upon him. Conrad of the Public Property Committee reported the sale of the hauling outfit at the Alliance Fire House sale netted $175.26. Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee received complaints from several members of the Central Fire Co. about the Company not being notified about the fire in Newport early in July 1914. He investigated and found that Chief Hunt gave instructions to “Exchange” to call Central Fire Co. but was unable to reach anyone. Bachman of the Fire Committee requested that Council meet to accept the Webb auto truck on August 7, 1914 at 6:30 P.M. Fire Chief Hunt reported he had inspected the Fire Houses and found everything satisfactory. He reported a grate was needed at the Northampton Fire House. Also, a call to a fire was received at 3:00 A.M. on July 3, 1914. He instructed exchange to notify Central Fire Co. and then got Alliance Fire Co. He deemed it advisable to have two Companies. Motion passed to move the telephone from Klotz’s barber shop to the residence of Assistant Fire Chief Lauer, to be on the same line as the Municipal Building.

August 7, 1914 - Beil and Lindenmoyer reported “the Webb Auto Truck for the Alliance Volunteer Fire Co. No. 1 is here and…it is satisfactory.” Motion passed to accept the truck and draw a voucher for the balance of $4,000.

August 21, 1914 - Motion passed to reimburse Jacob Lesher for three days of service at $3.30 per day for the time spent learning to operate the new truck. Motion passed instructing the Public Property Committee to obtain bids for necessary alterations to provide a coal bin at the Alliance Fire House.

September 3, 1914 - Fire Chief Hunt reported inspecting the Fire Houses and found them in satisfactory order. Reported on a fire call at 14 W. 14th Street on August 15, 1914. Central Fire Co. and Alliance fire Co. responded but did not go into action. The Chief reported something was wrong with the Alliance truck. It was taken apart and burned bearings were discovered. With permission of the Fire Committee, bearings were ordered and the truck would be back in service as soon as possible. Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee presented a list of equipment requested by the Alliance Fire Co.

September 17, 1914 - J. M. Campbell submitted a bid of $386 to install a coal bin at the Alliance Fire House. Motion passed to reject bid.

October 1, 1914 - Fire Chief Hunt visited the Fire Houses and found everything in satisfactory condition. There was a fire call at 2:00 A.M. on September 21, 1914 at 1367 Newport Avenue. Both Companies responded, only Central Fire Co. went into action. The Central Railroad had requested that Alliance Fire Co. meet a train at the Fairview House that same day to extinguish a fire on two cars, but the train was shifted onto a siding and the hose could not reach the burning cars. New shoes were requested by the Central Fire Co. for the auto truck and the tapper of the bell at the Municipal Building was out of order. The Public Property Committee was instructed to have it repaired.

November 5, 1914 - Fire Chief Hunt reported no fire calls and the Fire Houses were in satisfactory condition, but window strips were needed at the Alliance Fire House to keep out the cold air. Ordinance #271 providing for the appropriation of money from the Borough treasury to the Northampton Firemen’s Relief Association, in accordance with the law, was introduced and passed the first reading. Motion passed to suspend the rules and give the Ordinance a second reading. Ordinance #271 passed the second reading.

December 3, 1914 - Fire Chief Hunt visited the Fire Houses and found everything in satisfactory condition. On November 7, 1914, there was a fire call at Rev. Appel’s residence. Both trucks were ordered out. While returning from the call, the brake on the Alliance truck broke, temporarily putting the unit out of service. On November 8, 1914 at 3:15 A.M. a fire broke out in Rev. Delong’s house at 1380 Newport Avenue and the Central Fire Co. was ordered out. Also, chairs were needed for the Alliance truck and the pump of the Central truck was too weak to pump up the truck tires to the required pressure. Motion passed “to purchase Chain for the Alliance truck” and to purchase a motor-driven pump for the Central truck. Motion passed to buy coal at the Fire Houses. Motion passed to get weather strips at the Alliance Fire House.

December 28, 1914 - It was reported that the outside light at Northampton Fire House had not been fixed.

1915

January 7, 1915 - Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported the outside light at the Northampton Fire House had been repaired. Fire Chief Hunt visited the Fire Houses and found everything in satisfactory condition. There were no fire calls to report. He was informed that a team belonging to L. Snyder of Newport ran against a fire plug at 17th and Main Street and broke it. The Clear Springs Water Co. promised to repair it immediately. Motion passed keeping the janitor salaries the same in 1915 as they were in 1914. Motion passed to advertise for janitors, applications to be in the hands of the Secretary by January 28, 1915.

January 28, 1915 - Lewis Rodenbach was elected janitor of Northampton Fire House. J. J. Rice was elected janitor of the Municipal Building. F. C. Boyer was elected janitor of the Alliance Fire House. Ordinance #271 was passed providing for the appropriation of Foreign Fire Insurance Tax money to the Northampton Firemen’s Relief Association.

February 4, 1915 - Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported a refiner, pump and tube had been ordered but had not yet arrived. Fire Chief Hunt visited the Fire Houses and found everything in satisfactory condition. He reported a call to a fire at 1396 Railroad Alley, the home of Nicholas Kraftichn at 3:00 P.M. on January 26, 1915. The Central Fire Co. and the Alliance responded. The Central truck applied chemicals and the flames were extinguished.

March 4, 1915 - Ferl of the Public Property Committee requested a step ladder for the Northampton Fire House and the request was referred to the Fire Committee. Lindenmoyer reported the pump had been received but could not be installed on the Central truck and the search for a suitable pump was continuing. Fire Chief Hunt visited the Fire Houses and found everything in satisfactory condition, except a grate for the Northampton Fire House had not been provided. Also, on February 10, 1915 at 6:45 P.M. there was a fire at St. Paul’s Reformed Church, but no fire call had been given.

April 1, 1915 - Fire Chief Hunt visited the Fire Houses and found everything in satisfactory condition. No fire calls were received in March, however, there was a slight fire in George Conrad’s tenant house on Laubach Avenue on March 26, 1915, but with the aid of Conrad’s hose, the fire was extinguished with little damage.

April 8, 1915 - Fire Chief Hunt reported that the Central Fire Co. requested a light in their supply room.

May 6, 1915 - Lindenmoyer reported that Northampton Fire Co. was still looking for a grate and that a lock was broken at the Northampton Fire House. Motion passed to pay into the treasury of Northampton Firemen’s Relief the sum of $312.60. Fire Chief Hunt inspected the Fire Houses and everything was in satisfactory condition. A call was received on April 3, 1915 to E. 20th Street where a poultry building was on fire. Central Fire Co. responded but did not go into service. On May 3, 1915 there was a call to E. G. Snyder’s stable on Main Street near 13th Street. Both Alliance Fire Co. and Central Fire Co. responded but the truck of Central Fire Co. would not start and they arrived too late to go into service. On the way back to the fire House, the Alliance truck experienced trouble. The following day an experienced repairman adjusted the carburetor, but “in testing the truck the bolts on the reverse side of the former troublesome spot were sheared off and the truck is out of service.” On May 6, 1915 a car fire was extinguished with chemicals from the Central Fire Co. Motion passed to have the Solicitor prepare an Ordinance appropriating money for the Northampton Fire Co. W. W. Hunt was re-elected Fire Chief, defeating Ross Lauer by a Council vote of 6 to 3.

May 19, 1915 - Ordinance #276 was introduced and passed the first reading, appropriating $5,000 for an automobile truck for Northampton Fire Co.

June 3, 1915 - Gas and Electric Committee reported procuring tungsten lamps for the Alliance Fire House and that the Central Fire Co. would like the same for their quarters. Fire Chief Hunt inspected the Fire Houses and everything was in satisfactory condition. Also, fire plugs were tested and the pressure varied from 65 lbs, at the north end of Main Street to 130 lbs. at Main and Laubach. Several plugs were found to be in poor condition and Clear Springs Water Co. had been notified. Chief Hunt said he would recommend the purchase of a Siamese for Alliance Fire Co. Motion passed to purchase a Siamese for the Alliance Fire Co. and the matter was referred to the Fire Committee. Motion passed to place the matter of ordering tungsten lamps for the Central Fire House and the Northampton Fire House in the hands of the Public Property Committee.

June 21, 1915 - It was reported that tungsten bulbs cost $.22 each, but in lots of 100, a 10% discount was allowed. Motion passed that the Electric Light Committee purchase 100. Ordinance #276 appropriating $5,000, or a part thereof, for an auto truck for Northampton Fire Co. was given a second reading.

July 1, 1915 - Fire Chief Hunt inspected the Fire Houses and everything was in satisfactory condition. There were no fire calls during the month of June. Ordinance #276, appropriating $5,000 for a truck for Northampton Fire Co. was passed.

August 5, 1915 - Fire Chief Hunt inspected the Fire Houses and everything was in satisfactory condition. Alliance Fire Co. and the Central Fire Co. responded to a fire at Snyder’s stable and “did exceptionally good work as the standing part of the building indicates.” Motion passed offering “a reward of $200 for the arrest and conviction of the incendiary who burned Snyder’s stable.” Ordinance #276 was returned from the Burgess without his signature, having listed his reasons in his veto. Motion passed to lay over the veto until the next regular meeting.

September 2, 1915 - Fire Chief Hunt inspected the Fire Houses and everything was in satisfactory condition. The following fire calls were listed:

August 4, 1915 - Segal’s Store on W. 14th Street. Both companies responded and the water pressure was low.  The Alliance truck was taken to the Canal to pump water, which aided greatly in saving the property.

August 10, 1915 - A call to Bondy and Lederer Cigar Factory was received, but the fire was in Coplay. The Central truck went to assist if necessary.

August 22, 1915 - Fire at a barn on the Lawrence Farm. Central Fire Co. responded thinking the fire was within the Borough’s limits and with the chemicals saved the granary. Later the Alliance truck was called and pumped water from the creek. Lawrence Cement Co. was grateful.

September 9, 1915 - Ordinance #276 appropriating $5,000 for an auto truck for Northampton Fire Co. was passed, over the veto of the Burgess.

October 7, 1915 - Fire Committee had placed “ads” for bids for a triple combination truck for Northampton Fire Co. Fire Chief Hunt inspected the Fire Houses and everything was in satisfactory condition and he reported that there were no fire calls during the previous month. Bids for a hose, chemical and pumping truck were opened and representatives for the various bidders were given an opportunity to explain the merits of their products. (Editor’s note - All of the bids were well in excess of the $5,000 appropriated.) Motion passed to postpone action until October 21, 1915.

October 21, 1915 - Ordinance #279 appropriating an additional $3,000 for the fire truck for Northampton Fire Co. was introduced and passed first reading. Motion passed to suspend rules and give Ordinance #279 a second reading. Ordinance #279 passed the second reading.

November 4, 1915 - Fire Chief Hunt inspected the Fire Houses and everything was in satisfactory condition.

November 30, 1915 - Ordinance #279 appropriating an additional $3,000 for the purchase of a fire truck for Northampton Fire Co. passed the third reading. Ordinance #279 was declared passed.

December 2, 1915 - A communication from H. T. Raisbeck, plant manager of the Atlas Portland Cement Co. protesting against Ordinance #279, was read. Letter from the Central Fire Co. concerning a driver for their truck was read. Fire Chief Hunt inspected the Fire Houses and reported everything was in satisfactory condition and that there were no fire calls. Also, the Companies were preparing for an inspection of their equipment by the Underwriter’s Association. Conrad stated that no one at the Central Fire Co. would take it upon himself to keep the truck in running order without compensation. Motion (not seconded) to pay Ross Lauer $10 per month to care for the truck of the Central Fire Co. Motion passed to place the matter in the hands of the Fire Committee.

December 30, 1915 - Burgess returned Ordinance #279 without his signature and gave his reasons. Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported that Dayton airless tires and a self-starter had been ordered through Danner and Hoffman for the Central truck. Due to a 4 to 4 vote of Borough Council to pass Ordinance #279 over the veto of the Burgess, the Ordinance was declared lost.

1916

January 6, 1916 - Necessary motions passed establishing the salaries and janitors of the following Fire Houses:

1. Northampton Fire House, $12 per month, Lewis Rodenbach

2. Central Fire House, $30 per month, Josiah Rice

3.  Alliance Fire House, $15 per month, Frank Boyer

January 14, 1916 - Lindenmoyer reported the wheels on the Central Fire truck “are shipped to Phila.” Fire Chief Hunt reported a slight fire at Christman’s store on January 1, 1916 and a slight fire at the Mount Vernon Inn on January 5, 1916. Alliance Fire Co. responded to both fires but did not go into service. Fire Committee was appointed and the members were Lindenmoyer, Beil and Bachman.

February 3, 1916 - Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported the Dayton Airless tires for the Central Fire truck had been installed and “gave entire satisfaction.” Fire Chief Hunt inspected the Fire Houses and everything was in satisfactory condition. A fire call was received on January 31, 1916 at 14th and Stewart Streets. Alliance Fire Co. responded. Another fire call, later that same day at Samuel Laubach’s barn was received. Alliance Fire Co. and Central Fire Co. responded but only Alliance went into service. On February 3, 1916 a fire call was received that the Lyric Theatre was on fire. The Alliance truck responded but had trouble with the exhaust and Northampton Brewing Co.’s truck was used to covey the hose and ladders to the fire. They also conveyed 350 feet of hose from Central Fire House to Alliance Fire House. Chief Hunt reported that Alliance Fire Co. is short of rubber boots, coats and a jack and that there is a problem with the clutch on the Alliance truck. Motion passed to get a man from each Ward to attend to the fire apparatus and pay him $75 per year. Ross Lauer was elected to serve the position in the Second Ward. Motion passed to get bids to repair the Alliance truck. Coleman announced he would donate a half dozen high rubber boots to Alliance Fire Co. Motion passed to have the “proper Committee” procure six rubber coats for the Alliance Fire Co.

February 11, 1916 - A communication was read from International Motor Co. stating it was impossible for them to repair any trucks except trucks of their own manufacture. A communication was received from James Boyd and Brother stating “that Mr. Street their representative has gone into business for himself, so they are at a loss to any knowledge of the truck.” They were willing to offer the service of one of their mechanics. Motion passed to place the matter in the hands of the Fire Committee.

March 2, 1916 - Beil of the Fire Committee reported he was in Allentown in regards to repair parts for both trucks and the parts are expected any day. Fire Chief Hunt inspected the Fire Houses and everything was in satisfactory condition. There were no fire calls during the last reporting period. Ordinance #282, authorizing the installation of a fire alarm system, an appropriation therefore, also an additional appropriation for purchasing a chemical and hose truck for the Northampton Fire Co., was introduced. Motion passed to strike out Section III of Ordinance #282. (Editors note: I believe this section allowed for the purchase of the truck for the Northampton Fire Co. The rationale for the motion was that if both of the trucks were in “good shape” and if a fire alarm system were installed, this would be sufficient.) Ordinance #282 passed the first reading.

April 6, 1916 - Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported the party repairing the Central Fire truck had to alter the wheels causing a delay in delivering the truck.  Fire Chief Hunt inspected the Fire Houses and everything was in satisfactory condition. There were no fire calls during the month of March. Ordinance #282 passed the second reading.

May 4, 1916 - Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported the 2nd Ward fire truck was returned but would have to go back for minor repairs. Also, the 3rd Ward fire truck was received and tested. The pump showed 250 lbs on a Main Street plug. Fire Chief Hunt inspected the Fire Houses and everything was in satisfactory condition. There were no fire calls during the month of April. A petition with 111 signatures was presented and read requesting a fire alarm system and calling attention to the need for a combination pumping engine and chemical truck for the 1st Ward House. C. L. Appel was elected Fire Chief for a period of one year. Motion passed raising the salary of the “chauffeur” for the Central Fire Co. truck from $75 to $100 per year. Jacob Lesher was elected chauffeur of the Alliance Fire Co. truck. Ordinance #282 was passed authorizing the installation of a fire alarm system, making appropriations therefore and making additional appropriations for purchasing a chemical and hose auto truck for Northampton Fire Co. #1.

June 1, 1916 - Ordinance #282 was returned unsigned from Burgess A. H. Laros. (Editor’s note: He was in favor of the fire alarm system, but was strongly opposed to the purchase of a truck. He resented that the two items had been presented in the same Ordinance, so he vetoed the entire Ordinance. He felt the current horse-drawn apparatus could be converted to an auto truck at a cost of $2,500 - $2,800, thereby saving the taxpayers $5,200. He reprimanded Council for never having discussed or considered this option.) Fire Chief Appel inspected the Fire Houses and everything was in satisfactory condition. He suggested not using the gong during practice, but getting horns for the trucks and using them. He recommended that each Fire House have at least 800 feet of fire hose.

June 20, 1916 - Motion passed to lay over action on the veto of Ordinance #282 until the next regular Council meeting.

July 6, 1916 - Motion passed to renew the insurance on the First and Third Ward Fire Halls and pay the premiums of $193.50. Motion passed to pass Ordinance #282 over the veto of the Burgess. The vote was 5 yeas and 2 nays. The Council President declared the motion lost.

August 3, 1916 - Ordinance #285 calling for the installation of a fire alarm system and making appropriations therefore was introduced and passed first reading.

September 7, 1916 - Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported the 3rd Ward truck was out for practice and broke a pin. This was repaired and a horn was placed on the truck. Ordinance #285 passed the second reading.

October 5, 1916 - Ordinance #285 passed the third reading. Ordinance #285 passed by a vote of 5 to 2.

November 2, 1916 - The Burgess returned Ordinance #285 with his signature.

November 6, 1916 - Bartholomew of the Public Property Committee reported the big doors and ceiling at the 1st Ward Fire Hall were in bad condition. The matter was referred to the Public Property Committee. Fire Chief Appel reported no fires during his term of office, the trucks were in good condition and the Halls were in good shape except as reported at the 1st Ward Hall. Motion passed to have the Fire Committee advertise for bids for the installation of a fire alarm system. Ordinance #288 calling for the purchase of an auto truck and pumping engine for Northampton Fire Co. #1 was introduced and passed first reading.

November 23, 1916 - Acting on the recommendation of the Borough engineer, a motion passed to place the fire alarm boxes at the following locations:

27th & Cherryville Road Allen Trust Co.

Lawrence Cement Co. 14th & Washington Avenue

24th & Main Street 14th & Stewart Street

21st & Main Street Atlas Cement Co.

Park House 4th & Catasauqua Road

Between 23rd & 24th on Washington Avenue 9th & Main Street

18th & Washington Avenue 9th & Dewey Avenue

W. 17th & Main Street 10th & Adair Street

December 7, 1916 - A communication from the Gamewell Fire Alarm Telegraph Co. specifying the items necessary for the installation of a fire alarm system was read. Fire Chief Appel reported a fire on November 11, 1916 on E. 20th Street. The Central and Alliance Fire Cos. Responded “but the fire had too much headway to save the stable.” Ordinance #288 passed the second reading.

December 22, 1916 - Two bids were received for the installation of a fire alarm system, namely Gamewell Fire Alarm Telegraph Co. and Loper Fire Alarm Co. The matter was placed into the hands of the Fire Committee to report January 4, 1917. 

1917

January 4, 1917 - Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported he had consulted with the Atlas Portland Cement Co. in reference to placing a diaphone horn at the plant to try out before January 4, 1917, but read a telegram from Gamewell Fire Alarm Co. stating that they could not provide one by that date. Lewis Rodenbach was elected janitor of the First Ward Fire Hall at $12 per month for a period of one year. J. J. Rice was elected janitor of the Municipal Building at $30 per month for a period of one year. F. C. Boyer was elected janitor of the Third Ward Fire House at $15 per month for a period of one year. Ordinance #288 calling for the purchase of an auto truck and pumping engine for Northampton Fire Co. #1 passed the third reading and was finally passed by a vote of 7 to 2.

January 19, 1917 - The Borough Engineer reported the diaphone horn had arrived from the Gamewell Fire Alarm Co. and was conveyed to the Atlas Portland Cement Co. on January 13, 1917.

February 1, 1917 - The Burgess returned Ordinance #288 unsigned. Reasons listed were “inefficiency of funds and no use for more fire trucks.” Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported a test of the diaphone horn. He claimed it could not be heard in some parts of town. The contract for the installation of a fire alarm system was awarded to the Gamewell Fire Alarm Telegraph Co. for $3,750.

March 1, 1917 - C. L. Appel reported a fire call in Weaversville. The Company responded but did not go into action. The 66 fire plugs were tested and all were in good shape except five. Four of these were repaired and the last one would be repaired when the ground had thawed.

March 22, 1917 - The Secretary reported the Burgess had not yet signed the contract for the fire alarm system. The Burgess said he had not had time to look it over. The contract for the electrical supplies for the installation of the fire alarm system was awarded to Penn Gas Electrical Supply.

May 3, 1917 - Bartholomew of the Public Property Committee reported the First Ward Fire Hall needed repairs. This matter was referred to the Public Property Committee. Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported much of the material for the fire alarm system had arrived. W. W. Hunt was elected Fire Chief for a period of one year. Ross Lauer was elected Assistant Fire Chief for a period of one year. R. Lauer was also elected chauffeur for the Central Fire Co. for a period of one year. Lindenmoyer reported Mr. Lesher reported to him “they would look around for another man for chauffeur for the Third Ward Fire Co.” The matter was laid over until the next meeting. President instructed the Fire Committee to go ahead in putting up wire, etc. for the fire alarm system.

June 7, 1917 - Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported he took up the matter of putting up the wire for the fire alarm system with the Atlas Cement co. and they will not be in a position to “put up with this work.”

June 20, 1917 - Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported the Lehigh Valley Light & Power Co. would put up the cross arms and wire for the fire alarm system at a cost of about $45 per mile plus 10%. Motion passed to award contract for putting up cross arms and wires for the fire alarm system to the Lehigh Valley Light & Power Co., by paying $3.50 per day to the men and $3.75 per day for the foreman for 9 hours work, plus 10%.

July 5, 1917 - Bartholomew reported that H. E. Musselman had repaired the First Ward Fire Hall. Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported the Lehigh Valley Light & Power Co. had started putting up the cross arms and wire for the fire alarm system. He also reported that the Gamewell people would soon start. Fire Chief Hunt reported no fires during June and that the Halls and trucks were in good condition.

September 14, 1917 - Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported all of the wire for the fire alarm system was in place except at the railroad crossings at the Lawrence and the Atlas Cement Companies. The Borough Engineer explained that a road clearance of 25 to 30 feet was needed and he expects to hear from the railroad soon. Fire Chief Hunt reported the trucks and Halls in first class condition and no fires during August.

October 4, 1917 - Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee asked whether the Fire Chief and the Assistant Fire Chief were not allowed a 6-inch gong. The engineer stated they were and “would instruct the lineman in the morning.” Fire Chief Hunt reported the trucks and Halls in good condition. He reported a fire on September 17, 1917 at Undertaker A. S. Miller’s barn. No calls were received because the cables were burned. Also, a fire on September 26, 1917 at Rev. Delong’s W. 14th Street house. Alliance responded. Central was to respond but the Assistant Chief claimed he got not alarm.

November 1, 1917 - Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee said the Atlas Cement Co. agreed to place a steam whistle at Engine Room E – Plant 4. Fire Chief Hunt reported no fire calls for October and the apparatus in good condition.

December 6, 1917 - Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported the wiring completed for the alarm system and the steam line connected. The system will be put into operation soon. Fire Chief Hunt reported no fire calls for November and the apparatus in good condition.

December 28, 1917 - Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee introduced Mr. Spader of Gamewell, who explained everything was in readiness to test the fire alarm system on December 29, 1917. Motion passed to pay 25% of the contract to Gamewell Fire Alarm Telegraph Co.

1918

January 4, 1918 - Lindenmoyer of the Fire Committee reported the final test of the fire alarm system was conducted and proved very satisfactory. Motion passed to accept the fire alarm system.

January 10, 1918 - The following men were appointed to the Fire Committee; Messrs. Schepler, Coleman and Mitman. Schepler of the Fire Committee stated that some alarm signal system should be prepared. The matter was referred to the Fire Committee. Motion passed to pay the janitor at the First Ward Fire Hall $12 per month as before. Motion passed to pay the Municipal Building janitor $65 per month. He would be the janitor, fire truck driver and run the motor appliances for the fire alarm system. Motion passed to pay the janitor at Fire Hall #3 $15 per month as before. Lewis Rodenbach was elected janitor at the First Ward Fire for a period of one year. J. J. Rice was elected janitor of the Municipal Building for a period of one year. F. C. Boyer was elected janitor of the Third Ward Fire House for a period of one year.

January 24, 1918 - Schreiber of the Public Property Committee reported the supply of coal for the First Ward Fire Hall was exhausted and none could be had. Matter referred to Public Property Committee. Schepler of the Fire Committee reported the following schedule for alarms:

Two Blasts – a test

Three Blasts – fire out

Four Blasts – general alarm

Secretary sent a letter to Gamewell to repair a valve on the steam whistle. Secretary reported “the Company would send a man on Friday.” Fire Chief Hunt reported a fire call on December 31, 1917 at 17th and Main Streets, an extra set of chains was needed for the Alliance truck and all apparatus was in good shape except the carburetor on the Alliance truck.

February 7, 1918 - Gamewell Fire Alarm Telegraph Co. presented a check for $15.74 to repay the cost of repairing the valve for the fire whistle. Fire Chief Hunt reported no fire calls for January, 1918 and the apparatus in good condition. He reported several fire plugs were frozen. Motion voted on to dismiss Mr. Lauer’s services as chauffeur for the Central Fire truck was defeated by a vote of 3 to 4. A motion was defeated to reconsider the motion of the salary for the Second Ward janitor. (Editor’s note: Following this entry, there was an entry that reads, “The President…declared J. J. Rice elected as chauffeur for the Central Fire truck for one year.” At this point I am not clear on who was the chauffeur; Lauer or Rice.)

March 7, 1918 - Fire Chief Hunt reported no fire calls for February and the apparatus in good condition. Some fire plugs were still out of service. He notified the Underwriter’s Association of the fire alarm system installation and a representative will inspect the system and give the Borough proper credit. Motion passed to instruct the Fire Chief to purchase a new carburetor for the Alliance truck.

April 5, 1918 - Schreiber of the Public Property Committee reported that the boiler had been repaired at the Third Ward Fire Hall. Schepler of the Fire Committee reported that he had ordered a new carburetor for the Third Ward Fire truck. Fire Chief Hunt reported no fires during March, 1918 and the Halls and apparatus were in good shape, with the exception of the carburetor. The fire plugs were in good shape with a “test next week.”

May 2, 1918 - Schepler of the Fire Committee reported that the new carburetor on the Alliance Fire truck was giving good results. Also, the clutch on the same truck was temporarily repaired. W. W. Hunt reported no fires during April, 1918. Ross Lauer was elected Fire Chief and W. W. Hunt was elected Assistant Fire Chief, each for a period of one year. Schepler of the Fire Committee suggested that the heavy harness and truck in the Third Ward Fire Hall be disposed of. The matter was referred to the Fire Committee. Coleman complained of the carburetor being placed in the Third Ward Fire truck without notifying the Fire Committee. The President stated that the Committee should be notified of such action to enable them to make a satisfactory report.

June 6, 1918 - Schreiber of the Public Property Committee reported “bad doors at the 1st Ward Fire Hall, bad roof on the Municipal Building and poor doors and binding at the Third Ward Fire Hall.” Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported no fires during May and that the Alliance Fire Co. was in need of one nozzle to be repaired, six new lanterns and washers for the 2 ½ inch hose. He continued that the Central truck was not in good condition. He reported testing all of the fire alarm boxes, except one, and 4 of 11 have no ground wires. Boxes 54 and 42 were out of commission, but were repaired. He reported that he had replaced a pole at 4E Engine room himself. The Fire Hall repairs were referred to the Public Property committee. The requests of the Fire Chief was referred to the Fire Committee. The Secretary was instructed to notify the Gamewell Fire Alarm Co. about boxes 32, 36, 45 and 46 having no ground wires. Motion passed to allow the Alliance Fire Co. to move the telephone from the second floor to the first floor.

July 6, 1918 - A communication was received from the Gamewell Fire Alarm Co. giving reasons for not having ground wires on the Main Street fire boxes and the box placement.

August 1, 1918 - Schepler of the Fire Committee reported that the two fire trucks had been repaired. Fire Chief Ross Lauer added that the fire alarm boxes were in good condition. He reported a fire call on July 29, 1918 at 5:15 P.M. at J. J. Kleppinger’s barn and by 5:30 P.M. “3 streams were on the fire.” He requested brake lining for the Alliance truck and an extra tire for the Central truck. The nozzle had been repaired and the rubber goods were ordered.

September 5, 1918 - Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported no fires during August and that the fire alarm system was in good shape. He stated that the Alliance Fire truck’s battery and motor needed repair. Motion passed to instruct the Secretary to notify Mr. William Thomas, the chief engineer of the Atlas Portland Cement Co. to “turn off the steam, should anything happen to the fire alarm whistle at any time.” The repairs of the Alliance truck were referred to the Fire Committee. Motion passed to have the Fire Committee print more fire alarm cards and distribute them throughout the Borough.

October 3, 1918 - A communication was received from the Board of Health notifying Borough Council to remove the ashes from the 1st Ward Hall. Schepler of the Fire Committee reported that the Alliance Fire truck had been repaired at the Atlas Portland Cement Co. Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported that the system and apparatus were in good shape. A fire call from box 52 was responded to but the Company did not go into action. Also, a call from box 32 was responded to but it was only a slight fire. The old tire from the Central Fire truck was ready to be shipped away for repair.

November 7, 1918 - Lindenmoyer reported that the ashes had been removed from the 1st Ward Fire Hall. Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported no fires during October and that the apparatus and fire alarm system were in good shape.

1919

January 2, 1919 - The salaries and election of janitors of the three Fire Halls for a period of one year were set by separate motions as follow:

1st Ward Fire Hall, $12 per month, Lewis Rodenbach

Municipal Building, $60 per month, J. J. Rice

Third Ward Fire Hall, $15 per month, F. C. Boyer

February 6, 1919 - A motion was passed to lay over, until the next meeting, a request by communication from the Central Fire Co. recommending R. A. Klotz as driver for the Central Fire Co. Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported that the system and apparatus were in good shape. Three calls were responded to in January; one from box 45, one from box 72 and a false alarm from box 62. Also, he requested a rectifier to charge batteries for the Alliance Fire Co. and a 30 foot extension ladder for the Central Fire Co.  Motion passed to purchase a rectifier for the Alliance fire Co. Motion passed to purchase a 30 foot extension ladder for the Central Fire Co.

March 6, 1919 - Schepler of the Fire Committee reported that the Germansville Fire Co. wanted to buy a chemical truck and suggested that Council make an attempt to sell the chemical truck stored at the Alliance Fire Hall. Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported that the system and apparatus were in good shape. No fire calls were received during February. Also, the 30 foot ladder, as well as some other equipment, had arrived. Motion passed granting the Central Fire Co. permission to use Council Chambers on March 27, 1919. Motion passed authorizing the Fire Committee to sell the Alliance chemical truck. Motion passed setting the salary of the Central Fire Co. driver at $100 for a period of one year. Motion passed electing R. A. Klotz as driver for the Central Fire Co. for a period of one year.

April 3, 1919 - A communication was received from the Central Fire Co. requesting Council to reconsider the salary of the newly hired truck driver and make it $300 per year instead of $100 per year. Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported that the system and apparatus were in good shape. He reported three fire calls were responded to as follow:

March 26, 1919, Box 42 at 14th and Stewart Streets

March 31, 1919, Box 46 at 17th and Main Streets

April 2, 1919, Box 32 at 19th and Main Streets

The first two were small fires and “the last some what of a false alarm.” Also, he reported the Central Fire Co. chemical system was out of order and suggested purchasing 250 feet of one inch chemical hose. The Alliance chemical truck was reported out of commission. The 30-foot ladder for the Central Fire Co. had been received. The repair of the chemical truck was referred to the Fire Committee. A motion was defeated to change the annual salary of the Central Fire Co. truck driver from $100 to $300 by a vote of “3 yeas & 4 nays.”

May 1, 1919 - A communication was received from the Central Fire Co. requesting council to approve their election of John Geary as a driver for the Central Fire truck at a salary of $100 per year. Schepler of the Fire Committee reported the chemical hose was received and the chemical tank of the Central Fire truck was being repaired. Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported that the system and apparatus were in good shape with the exception of the chemical tank and that there were no fire calls during April. A motion passed electing W. W. Hunt as Fire Chief for a period of one year. A motion passed electing Ross Lauer as Assistant Fire Chief for a period of one year. A motion passed ratifying John Geary as the driver for the Central fire truck at a salary of $100 for a period of one year.

June 5, 1919 - Mitman of the Fire Committee reported the Alliance Fire Co. needed 75 feet of garden hose. Fire Chief W. W. Hunt reported no fires during May and that the alarm system and apparatus were in good shape, with the exception of the Central chemical tank which had been sent back to the factory. Motion passed to purchase six additional fire alarm boxes.

July 3, 1919 - Fire Chief W. W. Hunt reported no fires during the month of June and that the apparatus and fire alarm system were in good shape. The Central Fire Co. chemical tank had not yet been returned. A break in the lines at the Atlas Portland Cement Co. occurred on June 17, 1919, but was “repaired at once.”

August 7, 1919 - Mr. Stoneback (?) reported it was impossible to repair the Central Fire Co. chemical tank and quoted a price for 35 gallon tank at $385 and a 40 gallon tank at $425. Also, he reported the hand extinguishers were repaired. Schepler of the Fire Committee reported six additional fire boxes were received and were to be placed as follows:

7th & Washington Avenue

14th & Washington Avenue

13th & Newport Avenue

16th & Newport Avenue

On Washington Avenue between 22nd & 23rd Streets

25th & Main Street

Fire Chief W. W. Hunt reported the electrical storm on July 15, 1919 put the Municipal Building switchboard out of commission, but it was repaired. Also, there was a slight fire at 944 Main Street. The matter of the chemical tank was referred to the Fire Committee. The matter of selling the bell in the Municipal Building was referred to the Public Property Committee.

 

  

September 4, 1919 - Schepler of the Fire Committee reported that the 6 additional fire boxes had been placed and tested. He also suggested that new cards and schedules should be printed. Fire Chief W. W. Hunt reported no fires during the month of August and that the apparatus was in good shape. He reported that the Central Fire Co. tank had not been received. Also, he reported that there was no provision for handling blown fuses on the Municipal Building switchboard. He reported that Mr. Morris Smith had made the repairs. Fehnel of the Public Property Committee met with Mr. Porter about the bell and provided the weight “and so he is waiting to get a reply from him.”

October 2, 1919 - Fire Chief W. W. Hunt reported no fires during the month of September and that the apparatus was in good shape. He reported that the Central Fire Co. tank had not been received. On September 9, 1919 a call was received from Weaversville to respond to a fire at Peter’s barn. The Alliance Fire Co. responded but did not go into service.

November 6, 1919 – Mitman of the Public Property Committee reported they could only get the binding done at the Fire Halls. Not enough men were present for more repairs. Schepler of the Fire Committee reported the chemical tank had been received and “ordered Mr. Kiechel to look after it.” Fire Chief W. W. Hunt reported no fires during the month of October and that the apparatus was in good shape. He reported that the Central Fire Co. chemical tank had been received. A motion passed granting the Central Fire Co. permission to use the Council Chambers on the evening of November 7, 1919.

December 4, 1919 - Mitman of the Public Property committee suggested that the Secretary notify the Fire Companies “not to heat more rooms in the halls than is necessary to save coal.” (Editor’s note: Later in the meeting, a motion was passed to this effect. All Fire Co. Presidents were to be instructed to close all rooms possible.) He also suggested selling 2 sets of double harnesses in the Alliance Fire Hall. (Editor’s note: This was also addressed later in the meeting when the matter was referred, by motion, to the Fire Committee.) Fire Chief W. W. Hunt reported a fire call on November 28, 1919 at 12:57 P.M. at 16th & Main Streets. He reported the apparatus in good shape and that repairs to the chemical tank had not yet begun. Also, he reported a problem with the battery on the Alliance fire truck; not very strong any more.

December 30, 1919 - Mitman of the Fire Committee reported that the Alliance Fire Co. double harness had been sold to Monroe Miller for $30.

1920

January 8, 1920 - The salaries and election of janitors of the three Fire Halls for a period of one year were set by separate motions as follow:

1st Ward Fire Hall, $12 per month, Lewis Rodenbach

Municipal Building, $65 per month, J. J. Rice

Third Ward Fire Hall, $20 per month, F. C. Boyer

February 5, 1920 – A representative of the Presbyterian Church of Hokendauqua requested Council to reduce their offer of $400 on the Town Hall bell. Fire Chief W. W. Hunt reported the following fire calls:

December 23, 1919, Box 23 at 6:00 P.M. at the Sloyer residence.

December 29, 1919, Box 13 at 10:00 P.M. at an auto dealer.

January 1, 1920, Box 46 at 6:00 P.M. at the Diamond House.

January 12, 1920, Box 13 at 6:00 A.M. at Kramlich’s barn.

January 12, 1920, Box 64 at 11:25 A.M. at Zellner’s Row.

January 20, 1920, Box 45 at 6:55 P.M. at the Laubach House.

On January 12, a gear was broken on the Alliance Fire truck and their rectifier was out of commission. The chemical tank on the old Alliance truck could be placed on the Central truck, as the Central tank was beyond repair. The Chief recommended that the Fire Police should be sworn in so as to give them full authority. Also, the fire alarm boxes should be painted. (Editor’s note: These items were referred to the Fire Committee.) A motion passed to sell the Town Hall bell to the Presbyterian Congregation of Hokendauqua for $400. The purchase of badges for the Special Fire Police was placed in the hands of the Fire Committee. A motion passed to notify the different Fire Companies to heat their rooms as usual.

March 4, 1920 - Fire Chief W. W. Hunt reported no fires during the month of February. The replacement gear for the Alliance truck had not been received, nor had the chemical tank been placed on the Central Fire truck. Nozzles for applying hand chemicals had been ordered.

March 12, 1920 - A Special Meeting was held to consider a communication from the Atlas Portland Cement Co. regarding the Borough’s fire protection. The Atlas appealed to the Council to improve the fire apparatus and low water pressure. Also, they recommended purchasing an additional fire engine. Following discussion, a motion passed to purchase another triple combination fire truck and place it in the First Ward Fire Hall. A motion passed to buy a Hook and Ladder truck and place it in the Central Fire Co. A motion passed to have the Fire Committee advertise for bids for the two units.

April 1, 1920 - Mitman of the Public Property Committee reported a recurring sinkhole at the Third Ward Fire Co. Fire Chief W. W. Hunt reported no fires during March and “an auto. broke down the fire plug at 6th and Washington Ave.” The Town Hall bell was removed on March 30, 1920. Also, the Central Fire truck was in good shape again and the gear for the Alliance Fire truck had arrived and was being replaced. A motion passed to have a folding door placed between the truck room and the pool room at the Central Fire Hall. Ordinance #305, calling for an appropriation for additional fire apparatus, was read and passed the first reading. A motion passed to suspend the rules and give Ordinance #305 a second reading. Ordinance #305 passed the second reading.

May 6, 1920 - Fire Chief W. W. Hunt reported a slight fire on April 26, 1920 at 10:20 A.M. at the cigar factory. Central Fire Co. responded. The Alliance Fire truck is in “good shape again, with the battery somewhat weak.” A motion passed electing Ross Lauer as Fire Chief for one year. A motion passed electing W. W. Hunt as the Assistant Fire Chief for one year. Ordinance #305, calling for an appropriation for additional fire apparatus passed the third reading and was finally passed.

June 3, 1920 - Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported the apparatus in good shape, “the armature at the motor burned out so a new one is ordered, also the batteries should be inspected.” (Editor’s note: The minutes do not provide a reference to a particular truck or location.) A motion passed electing John Geary as driver of the Central Fire truck for one year, with the same compensation as the previous year. The Burgess, Dr. A. L. Laros, returned Ordinance #305 without his signature with the following reason:

“Gentlemen of Council;

The question of fire protection is an important one to every community and especially to our borough since the greater part of our buildings are of frame structure. The management of some of our corporations as well as citizens and taxpayers have requested better fire protection and it is your duty to give them the best possible protection.

The question then naturally arises what constitutes an efficient fire department for our borough.

It seems that the majority of Councilmen are willing to answer this question by the expenditure of $15-16,000 for fire apparatus without making provision for the proper care of the apparatus and as a consequence we would not have better fire protection than we have at the present time, since we all know the experiences with our fire apparatus in the past.

We do not need (to) buy new fire apparatus but what we do need is to properly handle and perfect the apparatus which we now possess.

As a means to have an efficient fire department for our borough I would suggest the combining of the three fire Companies into one strong company, The Northampton Fire Company. This would do away with the petty jealousies and rivalry which seems to exist now.

Centrally located the two trucks which we now possess, the two tanks furnish adequate protection as far as apparatus is concerned if handled properly. The hiring of men to take care of the apparatus and to operate them when necessity demands.

Gentlemen; we have an alarm system which works perfectly but our alarm system is all for naught unless we provide a system for the handling of our trucks equal in perfection to our alarm system.

Such a system can be procured by having paid drivers who would be on duty continually, who would learn the mechanism of our trucks and operate them intelligently and promptly in case of a fire. Such a system would be a direct benefit to every property owner and it would mean the saving of property and have a tendency to reduce fire insurance rates.

Now Gentlemen, before you take final action on this veto, I hope your actions will be governed by what is upright and just, and (not) by undue influence or rash promises as to appointments on important Committees or the improvement of streets in districts in which you reside, but be governed by the manly art of thinking for yourselves and then, and then only will you be doing a real service for the Borough of Northampton.

Signed

Laros, Burgess”

A motion passed, by a vote of 7 to 0, to override the Burgess’ veto. The President referred the matter of advertising for bids into the hands of the Fire Committee.

July 1, 1920 - Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported no fires during June and all apparatus was in running order. A motion passed (5 to 2) to accept the bid from American LaFrance Fire Engine Co. for “one type 38 triple combination pumping engine, chemical engine and hose motorcar; pump to have a capacity of 600 gallons per minute at 120 lbs. pump pressure, and 1 type “B” City Service Truck for the sum of $15,750 same apparatus without chemical tank $15,650.” (Editor’s note: The specific model was not designated in the motion.)

July 13, 1920 - A special meeting of the Council was called to re-advertise for bids for fire apparatus. Acting on the advice of the Solicitor E. C. Nagle, a motion was passed to rescind the action of July 1, 1920, awarding the bid for fire apparatus to the American LaFrance Fire Engine Co., by a vote of 6 to 2. A proposal was adopted to re-advertise for bids, to be received by 7:30 P.M., August 1, 1920, for a triple combination truck with the following specifications:

Chemical tank-Champion Babcock type or its equal

Pump-Rotary gear type with a capacity of a minimum of 500 gallons per minute at 120 lbs. of pressure, or its equal

City service hook and ladder truck with a motor of not less than 27 H.P. and,

1-40 foot extension ladder

1-24 foot single ladder

1-20 foot single ladder

1-16 foot single roof ladder

1-12 foot single roof ladder

2-25 foot single side ladders

August 5, 1920 - Mitman of the Fire Committee reported that new doors were received at the Fire Halls. Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported the fire alarm system and the trucks in good shape. A fire call from box 54 was received on July 30 at the Atlas Farm. Two companies responded. A fire call from box 62 was received on July 31. Three companies responded but none went into service. A motion to declare the results of the July 1 and July 13, 1920 meeting annulled was defeated. The bids for the fire apparatus were opened and tabulated. A motion passed (6 to 2) to award the bid to American LaFrance Fire Engine Co. for $15,750.

September 2, 1920 - Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported no fires during August and that the apparatus was in good shape. Also, a test of the Central Fire Co. chemical tank showed good pressure and is in good shape. He suggested that the Secretary advertise in a local paper to have all the property owners trim their tree branches so they do not contact the fire alarm system wires.

October 7, 1920 - Mitman of the Fire Committee reported that the doors were replaced at the Fire Halls and “a mistake was made at the Municipal Bldg. where he thinks Council should not be responsible.” Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported no fires during September and the Halls and apparatus in good shape, except that the Alliance Fire truck’s battery should be replaced. The matter was referred to the Fire Committee.

December 2, 1920 - A letter was received from the State Workman’s Compensation Fund informing Council that the rate to insure the Fire Chief and fire truck driver was $1.80 per $100 of payroll. Mitman of the Public Property Committee reported that all the repairs on the Fire Halls had been completed. Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported no fires during November and the Halls and apparatus in good shape.

1921

January 6, 1921 - A letter was received from the American LaFrance Fire Engine Co. stating that the new fire engine would be “shipped in the early part of January…” Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported no fires during December and the Halls and apparatus in good shape. The Alliance Fire truck was tested in December and produced 115 lbs. of pressure. The old armature for the motor on the fire alarm system was returned for rewinding.

January 12, 1921 - Separate motions passed setting the janitors’ salaries at the Fire Halls and electing the following individuals for a term of one year:

1st Ward Fire Hall, $20 per month, Lewis Rodenbach

Municipal Building, $65 per month, J. J. Rice

Third Ward Fire Hall, $20 per month, F. C. Boyer

February 3, 1921 - Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported no fires during January and the Halls and apparatus in good shape. A motion passed to install a fire alarm box at the Lawrence Portland Cement Co.

March 3, 1921 - A communication from the Atlas Portland Cement Co. was read requesting a reduction in test blows of 3 per week to 1 per week for the fire alarm system, to save coal. A motion passed granting the request by limiting to 1 test blow on a Wednesday evening. A motion passed to get a smoke protector for trial use. A motion passed to install a fire alarm box on lower Main Street and one at the bag factory on Laubach Avenue. Mitman of the Public Property Committee reported that some repairs and alterations were needed at the Alliance Fire Hall. Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported the fire alarm system and the trucks in good shape. He reported a fire call on February 9 from box #21, located at 13th and Newport Avenue. Two Companies responded. “He condemned our chemical end of the fire apparatus…”

March 24, 1921 - A special meeting was held to accept the new fire apparatuses and pay for them. Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported the trucks met the specifications and were approved by the Underwriter. A motion passed to accept the trucks and pay for them.

April 7, 1921 - A report was read from the Gamewell Fire alarm Telegraph Co. regarding the inspection of the batteries at the Municipal Building. The report suggested cleaning out the sediment and adding electrolyte. The matter was referred to the Fire Committee. Fire Chief Ross Lauer reported the fire alarm system and the trucks in good shape. He continued that the license applications for the new trucks had been returned because the trucks did not have the correct lenses. The President authorized the Fire Chief and the Fire Committee to see that proper lenses were placed on the trucks. A motion passed electing M. J. Stout as the chauffeur for the hook and ladder truck at the Central Fire Co.